Skip to main content

Matter

MATTER


Matter is anything that occupies space and has mass. Everything that exists in this universe is matter. The matter is made up of tiny particles known as atoms. It is usually found in 3 states(solid, liquid &gas).

Properties Of Matter

1) Matter is made up of particles:-

       Matter is made up of small particles known as atoms. These atoms join together to form molecules . 

2) Particles of matter have space between them:-

     Particles of matter have space between them which is known as intermolecular space.

3)Particles of matter attract each other:-

     Every particle of matter applies an attractive force on other particles. This means that every particle of matter      pulls the other particle toward itself. This force of attraction is known as inter-molecular-force of attraction.

4)Particles of matter are in continuous motion:-

     Particles of matter move continuously. The particles of matter move because they have kinetic energy.

States Of Matter


Matter is found generally in 3 stages at room temperature i.e. solid, liquid & gas. There are other two states of matter known as the BEC (Bose-Einstein condensate) and plasma. The states of matter usually depend on:-
  • The intermolecular force of attraction.
  • Inter-molecular space.

Solid

  • It is the state of matter with highest inter-molecular force and lowest intermolecular force of attraction.
  • The particles of solid have very low kinetic energy that is why they don't move. They vibrate at their own place.
  • Solids have a fixed shape and volume.

Liquid

  • It is the state of matter with moderate (between that of solid and liquid) intermolecular force and molecular force of attraction.
  • The particles of solid have moderate kinetic energy, they can move. 
  • Liquids have a fixed volume but not a fixed shape. 

Gas

  • It is the state of matter with lowest intermolecular force and highest intermolecular force of attraction.
  • The particles of solid have very high kinetic energy. 
  • Gases don't have a fixed shape and volume.

Enjoy your high school with - High School Pedia : www.highschoolpedia.com

Comments

Popular Posts

Anode Ray Experiment

→Anode ray experiment was conducted by E Goldstein. →These rays are also known as canal rays. →This experiment helped in the discovery of the proton. Apparatus Used A discharge tube  was taken in which there were 2 electrodes i.e. Anode(+ve) and the cathode (-ve). The tube was filled with an inert gas. A perforated or porous cathode was used. A layer of zinc sulphide was placed at the back of the cathode. There was a vacuum pump in the tube. High voltage (5000v-10000v) was allowed to flow through the system. It was observed that when the gas was at 1atm(atmospheric pressure ) no change was seen in the tube.  When the   pressure   was decreased inside the tube, a glow could be seen at the back side of the cathode.

Isotopes, Isobars and Isotones

Isotopes These are elements which have the same atomic number but different atomic mass . They have the same atomic number because the number of protons that are inside their nuclei remains the same. But, they have different atomic mass because the number of neutrons that are also inside their nuclei is different. As the number of protons inside nuclei remains same, therefore the overall charge of the elements also remains same as in isotopes: no of protons = no of electrons . Hence, as isotopes overall charge remains neutral, therefore their chemical properties will also remain identical.   Therefore, Isotopes are chemically same but physically different.

The Inverse & Reciprocal TRIGONOMETRIC Functions

So, this is my second post on trigonometry. In this post we're gonna cover the reciprocal and the inverse Trigonometric functions. If you haven't seen my first post you should definitely view it as it covers the basics of Trigonometry The Reciprocal Trigonometric Functions The reciprocal Trigonometric function of Sine is Cosecant, of Cosine is Secant & for Tangent it is Cotangent. Cosecant (Csc θ = 1/Sin θ) or (Hypotenuse/Opposite) Secant (Sec θ = 1/Cos θ) or (Hypotenuse/Adjacent) Cotangent (Cot θ = 1/Tan θ) or (Adjacent/Opposite) We can also represent Tan θ in another way. As Tan θ = opposite/adjacent  & Sin θ = opposite/hypotenuse  & Cos θ = adjacent/hypotenuse ∴ Tan θ = Sin θ/Cos θ (The hypotenuses cancel out) As Cot θ = 1/Tan θ  So, we can also represent Cot θ as Cos θ/Sin θ.

Rutherford Alpha Ray Scattering Experiment

Rutherford Alpha Ray Scattering Experiment Hey, Guys, most of you might have heard about the alpha ray scattering experiment and if you want to know in detail about Rutherford's model and the experiment he conducted, this is the right place for you... But first: Things You Must Know Some basic information that will help you understand rutherford experiment properly: Proton is a sub-atomic particle which is positively charged and has a mass of 1u. Alpha particles are helium atom with a charge of +2 as they have lost 2 electrons. Alpha particles have an atomic mass  of 4u. Gold is highly malleable and can be beaten into very thin sheets. Experiment Rutherford conducted his experiment in the following way: Rutherford took a very thin gold foil and bombarded it with high energy alpha particles. He placed a layer of zinc sulphide on the walls where the experiment was taking place because when alpha particles strike zinc sulphide layer, it results i

Cathode Ray Experiment

This experiment was conducted by J.J. Thomson (Sir Joseph John Thomson) in the year 1897. This experiment proved that atom is made up of fundamental particles which are much smaller than the smallest atom 'hydrogen' This experiment helped to discover electron. According to J.J. Thomson, the cathode rays consisted of very light, small and negatively charged particles. He named the particles "corpuscles" which were later known as electrons

UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE

UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE Europe's biggest club soccer competition, The UEFA Champions League, takes place every year. The competition begins in September and ends in May. It is a classic tournament following a round-robin format after which the top teams qualify to the knockout stages. It includes 32 best clubs in different countries of Europe. Obviously teams from major countries like England, Spain, France, Germany and Italy qualify easily while teams from smaller countries like Ireland, Austria, Netherlands, Denmark have to go through a qualifying round. The teams who win the leagues in their countries qualify directly while in some countries even the second, third and fourth placed teams also qualify. Sometimes a team may qualify in the Champions League because they finished in the top-four. These clubs may or may not qualify through their leagues but their good performance may help them qualify. Even the champions of The UEFA Europa League, another prestigious league

Important Mathematical Constants!

Important Mathematical Constants Mathematical constants are those numbers that are special and interesting because they come up in the various fields of mathematics like geometry, calculus etc. These mathematical constants are usually named after the person who discovered it and they are represented by a symbol that is usually picked up from the Greek alphabet. Mathematical constants are by definition very important. In this article we will take a look at certain mathematical constants that are more commonplace than others. 1.       π (pi) or Archimedes constant (~3.14159):   π is defined as the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. This is probably the most popular mathematical constant. So π is the circumference of the circle whose diameter is 1 unit. You might have seen it popping up when calculating the area of a circle (πr 2 ) or the circumference of a circle (2πr). It has many uses throughout mathematics from calculating the area of certain shap